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Kleinwort Hambros Emerging Artist Prize 2019

Kleinwort Hambros launches innovative Emerging Artist Prize to recognise rising talent in UK Contemporary Art

The initiative rewards the work of a UK artist aged up to 35 who has made an original artistic contribution in one or more of the following fields: painting, photography, sculpture, digital, installation art, drawing and video.

Artists from all regions across the UK have been  nominated by independent experts from the UK contemporary art scene. A jury made up of prestigious names, including Hans-Ulrich Obrist, Director of the Serpentine Gallery, Claire Lilley, Director of the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Andrew Nairne, Director of Kettle’s Yard at the University of Cambridge, Fiona Bradley, Director of the Fruitmarket Gallery and Aurélie Deplus, Head of Contemporary Art Sponsorship at Societe Generale, will then select five finalists. The final jury decision will be announced at a gala event in February 2019.

This initiative demonstrates  our ambition to  become a patron of the arts in the UK and a forward-thinking private bank interested in creativity and innovation. This also fits with our UK regional presence which we started to build over 10 years ago and supporting young local artists is another way to show our commitment to these regions.

 

See below the list of the 15 artists selected for the Kleinwort Hambros Emerging Artist Prize.

  • Christopher James Burns
  • Evan Ifekoya
  • France-Lise McGurn
  • Freya Dooley
  • Georgia Lucas Going
  • Helouise O’Reilly
  • Henry Driver
  • Joel Weaver
  • Joy Labinjo
  • Larry Achiampong
  • Liam Crichton
  • Lindsey Mendick
  • Lisa Denyer
  • Rachel Adams
  • Rebecca Ackroyd 

Kleinwort Hambros has commissioned the specialist art consultancy firm, ArtFlow agency, to advise on the creation and production of this prize.

The Kleinwort Hambros Emerging Artist Prize follows the successful and very well-received launch of the Swiss Emerging Artist Prize by Societe Generale Private Bank in April 2018.

The jury

Aurélie Deplus

Aurélie Deplus

Curator Societe Generale Collection, Paris
Aurélie Deplus
Hans Ulrich Obrist

Hans Ulrich Obrist

Director Serpentine Galleries, London
Hans Ulrich Obrist
Fiona Bradley

Fiona Bradley

Director Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh
Fiona Bradley
Clare Lilley

Clare Lilley

Director of Programme Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Yorkshire
Clare Lilley
Andrew Nairne

Andrew Nairne

Director Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge
Andrew Nairne
Aurélie Deplus

Aurélie Deplus

Curator Societe Generale Collection, Paris

Aurélie Deplus has been the Public Relations Manager for the Societe Generale's Group since September 2017 and the Philanthropy Manager since December 2013. Previously, Aurélie was in charge of communication for the Financing Division of Corporate and Investment Banking at Societe Generale, a position she held since January 2008. She began her career in 1993 as a financial analyst at HSBC, then moved to Crédit Lyonnais and Close Brothers. She joined Societe Generale's Corporate and Investment Banking in 2001 as an M&A and Corporate Financial Analyst and then on Financial Institutions. Aurélie Deplus is a graduate of the Institut Supérieur de Commerce, the Société Française des Analystes Financiers and educated at Christie's Education.

Photo credits: © clairobscur

Hans Ulrich Obrist

Hans Ulrich Obrist

Director Serpentine Galleries, London

Hans Ulrich Obrist was born in 1968 in Zurich, Switzerland. He is Artistic Director of the Serpentine Galleries, London. Prior to this, he was the Curator of the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. Since his first show “World Soup” (The Kitchen Show) in 1991 he has curated more than 300 shows.

In 2011 Obrist received the CCS Bard Award for Curatorial Excellence, and in 2015 he was awarded the International Folkwang Prize for his commitment to the arts. Obrist has lectured internationally at academic and art institutions, and is contributing editor to several magazines and journals.

His recent publications include Mondialité, Somewhere Totally Else, Ways of Curating,The Age of Earthquakes with Douglas Coupland and Shumon Basar, and Lives of The Artists, Lives of The Architects.

Photo credits: © Youssef Nabil

Fiona Bradley

Fiona Bradley

Director Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh

Fiona Bradley has an MA in art history from Cambridge University and an MA and PhD from the Courtauld Institute London. She started her curatorial career at Tate Liverpool and the Hayward Gallery, London, and has been Director of The Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh since 2003. She has curated exhibitions and produced publications with numerous important Scottish and international artists. In 2011 she commissioned Martin Creed's award-winning Work 1059, and was the curator for Scotland’s contribution to the Venice Biennale with an exhibition of the work of Karla Black. She has been a member of differents juries such as the Turner Prize and the Paul Hamlyn Award in 2007. She currently sits on the Imperial War Museum’s Contemporary Commissioning Committee, the Freelands Foundation Advisory Committee, and is a member of the Selection Committee for the British Pavilion for the 2019 Venice Biennale. She was awarded an OBE for services to the arts in 2018.

Photo credits: ©

Clare Lilley

Clare Lilley

Director of Programme Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Yorkshire

Clare Lilley is Director of Programme at Yorkshire Sculpture Park, which in 2014 was awarded UK Museum of the Year. Her recent curated and published works include Ai Weiwei, Shirin Neshat, Giuseppe Penone, Bill Viola among more others. She is curator of Frieze Sculpture, London (2012-18); and Jaume Plensa in San Giorgio Maggiore, Venice (2015). Clare sits on the Advisory Committee of the Government Art Collection, London, and on the boards of Site Gallery, Sheffield and Art UK, London. She is an invited member of the UK Women Leaders in Museums Network, is a nominator for the Nasher Sculpture Prize, Texas and has nominated or judged a number of prizes. Clare has presented many papers internationally. She authored the introductory essay for Clay and Ceramic in Contemporary Art, published by Phaidon Vitamin C in 2017 and is an advisor for Thames & Hudson’s 100 Sculptors of Tomorrow, 2018. Clare regularly appears in national and international media to comment on contemporary art, art in the public realm, and the role of the museum in society.

Credit photo © Jonty Wilde

Andrew Nairne

Andrew Nairne

Director Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge

Andrew Nairne has been Director of Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge, since 2011. He is a former Director of Dundee Contemporary Arts and Modern Art Oxford. He has worked with numerous UK and international artists. In the 1980s and 1990s, as a curator in Glasgow, he organised exhibitions with artists from Eastern Europe and supported the rise of a new generation of British artists.

Andrew Nairne led the £11m redevelopment of Kettle’s Yard, which reopened in February 2018. Recent exhibitions have included Actions. The image of the world can be different, Antony Gormley SUBJECT and Julie Mehretu: Drawings and Monotypes.

credit photo: ©Josh Murfitt

The 5 finalists

Larry Achiampong

Larry Achiampong

Larry Achiampong
Rebecca Ackroyd

Rebecca Ackroyd

Rebecca Ackroyd
Liam Crichton

Liam Crichton

Liam Crichton
Freya Dooley

Freya Dooley

Freya Dooley
Evan Ifekoya

Evan Ifekoya

Evan Ifekoya
Larry Achiampong

Larry Achiampong

Larry Achiampong holds a BA in Mixed Media Art from the University of Westminster and an MA in Sculpture from Slade School of Art. His work explores notions of post-colonialism and cultural memory through sound, video, installation, performance, and archival materials. He recently launched the first phase of ‘Relic Traveller’, an ambitious multidisciplinary Afrofuturist project and speculative work that unravels clue like testimonies of the past (and future) to inform the potentials of a prosperous Pan-African continent independent from the global west.

One of four flags designed for the ‘PAN AFRICAN FLAG FOR THE RELIC TRAVELLERS’ ALLIANCE’, ‘(ASCENSION)’ represents the 54 countries of Africa as stars with green, black and red reflecting the land, its people and the struggles they have endured. These colours are set against gold to celebrate a new dawn and prosperity. In a post-Brexit Britain and an increasingly anti-migrant geo-political context, the significance of a unifying emblem - which relates to nation and identity - is a poignant statement.

The Glyth series is a highly personal body of work, in which the artist uses images from his own family album. Their faces are replaced by black discs, rendering them anonymous and bereft of individuality. The red lips refer to racist stereotypes which have long-existed in British society and references the (mis)representation of blackness in popular culture.

Rebecca Ackroyd

Rebecca Ackroyd

Rebecca Ackroyd obtained her post-graduate degree from the Royal Academy in 2015. Her work explores oppositions, notably between architecture/human, domestic/urban and feminine/masculine. She works with a wide variety of media, from found objects, wire mesh, plaster and wax sculptures to works on paper.

Ackroyd’s works compose a dreamlike world. The artist seems to portray our reality through the lens of another dimension. Here female figures ‘bask’ on the gallery floor, their crash helmet heads cut them from contact with us, while their interior is exposed through blood-red ‘windows’.

Our physical and psychological experience of space is important to the artist and is explored in her installations. From oversized body parts in rough plaster to a manhole placed in the centre of a room, Ackroyd leads us on a narrative journey, which although open to interpretation, clearly invites us to question our assumptions on the world around us.

In parallel to the material and physical aspect of her work, Ackroyd produces sublime gouache, pastel and charcoal works on paper. The fantastical dream-like renderings function in harmony with the sculptural installations and allow the artist to work through ideas and freely explore her imagination.

Liam Crichton

Liam Crichton

Liam Crichton initially began studying interior architecture before focusing on sculpture at Edinburgh College of Art, for which he obtained a BA Hons degree in 2010. Crichton is interested in physical space, notably the built environment. He works with everyday materials, often appropriated from construction, such as steel, wood or glass. He also uses sound as a material, considering it to form part of our physical experience of space.

His works explores ideas of minimalism, or what he calls the essence of form and space, physicality and entropy. Crichton’s work is often site-specific and dialogues with the social and historical context of the location.

Crichton describes his 2016 installation ‘Echo Chamber’, as an anti-monument. It references the civic sculptures located around Belfast City Town Hall. These ‘echos’ of past grandeur, today sit silent and powerless, their significance lost in the tumult of everyday life. An audio recording taken on site is projected through a guitar amplifier on a steel plinth. This simulacrum of traditional sculpture subverts social codes, combining high and low art forms. The fragility of the fine steel plinth contradicts notions of permanence and reminds us of the timelessness of monuments.

Freya Dooley

Freya Dooley

Freya Dooley obtained a first class BA Hons in Fine Art from the Cardiff School of Art and Design in 2011, and in 2017 was a participant in The Syllabus, an alternative learning programme jointly delivered by seven UK arts organisations. She works with text, moving image, sound, installation and performance. The voice and words play an integral role in Dooley’s artistic practise. They often take the form of monologues or layered sound works accompanied by film or performance. Her work employs intimate thoughts, literature and pop culture references to attempt to articulate anxious or unstable narratives.

In ‘Speakable Things’, 2018, the artist juxtaposes fragmented imagery with a spoken narrative and soundtrack elaborating the well-known story of the mythological nymph Echo. The work connects contemporary public figures such as Britney Spears with classical archetypes who have literally or figuratively lost their voices. ‘Speakable Things’ offers a complex meditation on the voice as conduit for the interior/exterior, body/mind, personal/public. Literary texts are interspersed with images of lip-syncs and wild landscapes, and explores the representation of women as figures of ruin in popular culture.

In ‘Being Sharon’, 2018, a collaborative project with Cinzia Mutigli, they explore the hidden social codes and flattened politics of soap operas through spoken performance and film. The work is an ongoing exploration of soap operas as a means to create an alternate fictional spectacle of the mundanity of everyday life.

Evan Ifekoya

Evan Ifekoya

Evan Ifekoya holds a BA Hons in New Media from Winchester School of Art and an MA in Contemporary Art Practice from the Royal College of Art, London. Their work is influenced by music, notably by music videos and the nightclub scene. Through performance, installation, video and sound, Ifekoya explores notions of gender, queer, eroticism and identity. The spoken word is also a fundamental element in their work. They refer to a rich and diverse archive of literary experience, often blurring lines between the past and future, by weaving in futuristic narrative through science fiction.

Ifekoya presents a complex plural artistic identity, using polyvocality in audio narratives, collaborative production and multi-person performance pieces. Indeed the artist refers to themselves with a gender non specific plural pronoun, creating a collective personal identity and questioning subjectivity.

In ‘The Gender Song’, Ifekoya weaves a multitude of influences including the aesthetics of dance and hip-hop videos from the late 1980s, homemade beats and a nursery rhyme style verbal treatise to confidently unpack the myths of gendered expectations. The artist portrays themselves dancing in both male and female conventions, while the chorus repeats "Female, He-male, She-male don’t matter". While ‘Ritual Without Belief’ is a large scale installation and sound work extending over 6 hours. The dark blue ocean and helium balloons represent the ever changing and cyclical nature of our subjective experience.

01
Mar
2019
Kleinwort Hambros reveals winner of its inaugural Emerging Artist Prize
Award demonstrates support for UK emerging artists
News
Award demonstrates support for UK emerging artists
Kleinwort Hambros reveals winner of its inaugural Emerging Artist Prize
13
Feb
2019
Kleinwort Hambros announces finalists for Emerging Artist Prize
Award demonstrates support for UK regional young artists
News
Award demonstrates support for UK regional young artists
Kleinwort Hambros announces finalists for Emerging Artist Prize
28
Nov
2019
Kleinwort Hambros Emerging Artist prize : interview with Paul Kearney and Katie Kennedy
As we are only a few weeks away from revealing the winner of the Kleinwort Hambros Emerging Artist Prize, we have asked...
Art
As we are only a few weeks away from revealing the winner of the Kleinwort Hambros Emerging Artist Prize, we have asked our Head of Private Banking, Paul Kearney and ArtFlow Agency founder Katie Kennedy to tell us more about the creation of this prize.
Kleinwort Hambros Emerging Artist prize : interview with Paul Kearney and Katie Kennedy
09
Nov
2018
Societe Generale supports rising talent in UK Contemporary Art

Supporting Contemporary Art for over 20 years 

Within the UK a long-standing corporate partnership with the Victoria & Albert museum has seen the bank act as main sponsor for two flagship exhibitions in ‘Botticelli Reimagined’ and ‘Opera: Passion, Power and Politics’. The bank is the first sponsor to have supported two of the gallery’s flagship exhibitions in successive years. Societe Generale is also a corporate partner of the National Portrait Gallery in London.

The bank’s head office in Paris is home to a diverse contemporary art collection (photography, paintings, sculptures, lithography, etc), which embodies the Group's support of artistic creation around the world. The development of the Collection went hand in hand with a desire to share contemporary art with the wider public, especially children. Guided tours, educational workshops, artistic projects and a growing visibility on social media all contribute to this commitment.